Indian Ocean Travel by TOURISMER

 

The clothesline technique: In the Seychelles, scientists are saving corals

 

The clothesline technique Placed on the sand, these fragments are doomed to die slowly. The recovered corals are then cut into pieces, which will increase their chances of survival. They will then be used to repopulate the sick reef of the neighboring island, in very poor condition. There, the corals are bleaching and dying from lack of food. But also because the temperature of the water increases there, from year to year. “There is no connection between the two islands. There is a channel and the current is very strong, which prevents coral larvae from growing there”, explains the scientific and technical manager. After 45 minutes, 20 kilos were brought to the surface using baskets and balloons filled with air. . These fragments will now have to grow, expand, strengthen before being transplanted. Here is the technique used: that of the clothesline. “You have to place them every ten centimeters on the ropes, tie knots and tighten them. And then it will grow back”

More infos on : https://www.tf1info.fr/environnement-ecologie/video-rechauffement-climatique-seychelles-ils-font-revivre-les-coraux-dans-des-nurseries-sous-la-mer-2259678.html

 

 

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The clothesline technique: In the Seychelles, scientists are saving corals